Ask me anything   Submit   “The theory of quantum electrodynamics describes Nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And it agrees fully with experiment. So I hope you can accept Nature as She is--Absurd.”
--Richard Feynman
Fig. 4. Immunofluorescent expression of PPAR-α in the dopaminergic nigrostriatal circuit. (A–C) Red PPAR-α-labeled cellular nuclei are mainly located in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), and the ventral tier of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) where they overlap with green TH+ dopamine neurons (white arrows). The inbox in C shows a magnified image of PPAR-α-labeled neurons in the ventral tier of the substantia nigra. Many neurons inside the red nucleus (R) express PPAR-α, and this signal is nearly absent in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). (D–H) Red PPAR-α-labeled cells are located widespread in the striatum (Str) surrounded by green TH+ fibers. The receptors PPAR-α are mostly observed with a nuclear localization (white arrows). Note red PPAR-α-ir inside fiber bundles of the internal capsule crossing the striatum. (I) Magnified image of PPAR-α-labeled neurons in the substantia nigra showing that receptors mostly show a nuclear distribution but there is also cytoplasmic expression (yellow cytoplasmic signal). Abbrev.: PPAR-α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α; R, red nucleus; SNc, substantia nigra pars compacta; SNr, substantia nigra pars reticulata; Str, striatum; TH, tyrosine-hydroxylase; VTA, ventral tegmental area.

Fig. 4. Immunofluorescent expression of PPAR-α in the dopaminergic nigrostriatal circuit. (A–C) Red PPAR-α-labeled cellular nuclei are mainly located in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), and the ventral tier of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) where they overlap with green TH+ dopamine neurons (white arrows). The inbox in C shows a magnified image of PPAR-α-labeled neurons in the ventral tier of the substantia nigra. Many neurons inside the red nucleus (R) express PPAR-α, and this signal is nearly absent in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). (D–H) Red PPAR-α-labeled cells are located widespread in the striatum (Str) surrounded by green TH+ fibers. The receptors PPAR-α are mostly observed with a nuclear localization (white arrows). Note red PPAR-α-ir inside fiber bundles of the internal capsule crossing the striatum. (I) Magnified image of PPAR-α-labeled neurons in the substantia nigra showing that receptors mostly show a nuclear distribution but there is also cytoplasmic expression (yellow cytoplasmic signal). Abbrev.: PPAR-α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α; R, red nucleus; SNc, substantia nigra pars compacta; SNr, substantia nigra pars reticulata; Str, striatum; TH, tyrosine-hydroxylase; VTA, ventral tegmental area.

— 1 year ago

Plasmolysis of turgid plant cells.

Plasmolysis of turgid plant cells.

— 1 year ago

Henry VanDyke Carter’s drawings he did in 1856-7 for the 1860 Edition of Grey’s Anatomy. 

Henry VanDyke Carter’s drawings he did in 1856-7 for the 1860 Edition of Grey’s Anatomy. 

— 1 year ago

A multiple (5) exposure photomicrograph of melt-recrystallized ascorbic acid (the wheat field), xanthan gum base (the mountains), the microscope field diaphragm defocused with a yellow filter (the moon), and liquid crystalline polybenzyl-L-glutamate spherulites (the stars) with a blue filter to simulate the sky. This photomicrograph utilizes both brightfield and polarized light photomicrography.
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/microscapes/pages/aaidaho.html

A multiple (5) exposure photomicrograph of melt-recrystallized ascorbic acid (the wheat field), xanthan gum base (the mountains), the microscope field diaphragm defocused with a yellow filter (the moon), and liquid crystalline polybenzyl-L-glutamate spherulites (the stars) with a blue filter to simulate the sky. This photomicrograph utilizes both brightfield and polarized light photomicrography.

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/microscapes/pages/aaidaho.html

— 2 years ago

My first stop motion attempt.  

— 2 years ago

geneticist:

Caddis fly larvae protect their developing bodies by building themselves sheaths of silk and incorporating substances found in their habitats. Artist Hubert Duprate placed a group of Caddis fly larvae into a tank with gold and other precious substances for the larvae to spin into their sheaths.

geneticist:

Caddis fly larvae protect their developing bodies by building themselves sheaths of silk and incorporating substances found in their habitats. Artist Hubert Duprate placed a group of Caddis fly larvae into a tank with gold and other precious substances for the larvae to spin into their sheaths.

— 2 years ago with 2934 notes